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Overview of corruption and anti-corruption in the energy sector with a focus on Ghana

The energy sector presents its own unique set of corruption risks depending on the fuel type, power generation process and service delivery, among others. Understanding energy value chains could help identify various gaps and opportunities for anti-corruption entry points in the sector. The Ghanaian energy sector has mixed examples of anti-corruption success (for instance, the review of power purchase agreements) and failures (electricity tapping and supply issues at the service location level). A few anti-corruption approaches aimed at the sector include, but are not limited to, preventing procurement fraud, proper planning of energy projects and mitigating risks of unsolicited proposals.

24 May 2022
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Main points

  • Value chains highlight a way of looking at the various layers of often complex energy systems.
  • Risks from unsolicited proposals, corruption in procurement, bribery and theft are some corruption risks manifesting at different levels of the energy value chain in Ghana.
  • A few anti-corruption approaches aimed at the sector include preventing procurement fraud, proper planning of energy projects and mitigating risks of unsolicited proposals, among others.

Cite this publication


Rahman, K.; (2022) Overview of corruption and anti-corruption in the energy sector with a focus on Ghana. Bergen: U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre, Chr. Michelsen Institute (U4 Helpdesk Answer 2022:9)

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About the author

Kaunain received her Master's in Corruption and Governance from The Centre for the Study of Corruption at the University of Sussex in the UK where her focus area of research was corruption in international business. She works as Research Coordinator at Transparency International (TI), and her main responsibilities lie with the Anti-Corruption Helpdesk.

Disclaimer


All views in this text are the author(s)’, and may differ from the U4 partner agencies’ policies.

This work is licenced under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International licence (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Keywords


Ghana, energy sector