Justice Sector

The justice sector is crucial in maintaining accountability. At the same time, justice sector institutions can be part of the corruption problem.

Corruption reduces the accessibility and quality of justice and the legitimacy of not only justice sector institutions but the state more generally. By undermining contract enforcement and property rights, corruption in the justice sector can negatively affect much needed investment in developing countries.

U4 examines approaches to improve justice sector integrity such as the monitoring of judicial reform processes and social accountability mechanisms. The rationale and effectiveness of specialised anti-corruption tribunals will also be explored. 

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Photo: Ben Sutherland on flickr.com

Corruption Hunters – investigating and prosecuting financial crime

 
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Author: Sofie Arjon Schütte, Paavani Reddy, Liviana Zorzi
Release date: April 2016

A transparent and accountable judiciary to deliver justice for all

Corruption is hampering the delivery of justice globally. People perceive the judiciary as the second most corrupt public service, after the police. UNDP presents in this report, prepared in cooperation with U4 Anti-Corruption Resource Centre, a series of successful experiences from Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Indonesia, Kenya, Kosovo*, Nepal, Nigeria, Paraguay, Philippines, and Somalia, in promoting transparency and accountability within the judiciary.

Opening up judicial systems fosters integrity and increases public trust without impeding independence of the judiciary. The report advocates for judiciaries to open up to peer learning by engaging representatives of other countries in capacity assessments to improve judicial integrity. It also encourages judiciaries to consult end-users, associations of judges and use new technologies to foster transparency and accountability.

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Author: GIZ
Release date: January 2014

How to note: Using Community Policing to Promote Gender Equality and Prevent Corruption

 

Community policing (CP) interventions supported by
German development cooperation have been used to
reform the justice sector in northern Afghanistan, reduce
violence against women in Bangladesh, solve land
disputes in Mozambique, and support police reform in
Burundi. These experiences have shown that while CP is
not a universal remedy, as an intervention it can address
various, specific reform needs. This how to note for project
managers in development cooperation is an attempt to
illustrate that flexibility through a framework that outlines
how to include gender equality and anti-corruption
reform targets into CP interventions. We do so by introducing
the concept of primary and secondary objectives as
part of the design of a CP intervention.

Community policing (CP) interventions supported by German development cooperation have been used to reform the justice sector in northern Afghanistan, reduce violence against women in Bangladesh, solve land disputes in Mozambique, and support police reform in Burundi. These experiences have shown that while CP is not a universal remedy, as an intervention it can address various, specific reform needs. This how to note for project managers in development cooperation is an attempt to illustrate that flexibility through a framework that outlines how to include gender equality and anti-corruption reform targets into CP interventions. 

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