International Drivers of Corruption

Some global mechanisms allow corruption to be a profitable crime. Find out how to deal with the negative impact this brings to developing countries.

Globalisation has been beneficial in many ways. However, the structures that facilitate legitimate businesses and international financial transactions are also used for illicit purposes: laundering proceeds of corruption, generating illicit flows out of development countries, paying bribes or evading taxes. These mechanisms create incentives for corrupt behavior in developing and developed countries and need solutions at local and international levels.

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Illicit financial flows and their impacts on development

Lecture by Raymond Baker from Global Financial Integrity (1 Oct 2010)
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Author: OECD
Release date: September 2014

Few and Far: The Hard Facts on Stolen Asset Recovery

Development agencies which are committed to development effectiveness have an important role to play in the asset recovery process. Development agencies' involvement is key because the return of the proceeds of corurption to developing countries is a tool with significant developmnt impact. returned funds contribute to achieving direct development goals in the health and education sectors as well as provide other benefits to developing countries. 

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Author: OECD
Release date: December 2013

Measuring OECD Responses to Illicit Financial Flows from Developing Countries

 

This report aims to measure and compare the efforts of OECD
countries to control illicit financial flows from developing
countries by measuring their performance against international
standards for combating economic and financial crimes.
It does not attempt to assess the accuracy of existing estimates
concerning the scale of illicit flows, nor the relative importance
of the various forms or methods used for transferring funds.

This report aims to measure and compare the efforts of OECD countries to control illicit financial flows from developing countries by measuring their performance against international standards for combating economic and financial crimes. It does not attempt to assess the accuracy of existing estimates concerning the scale of illicit flows, nor the relative importance of the various forms or methods used for transferring funds.

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