Evaluation & Measurement

Evidence on what works and why is sparse in anti-corruption. Find guidance on how to improve evaluations and measurement tools to inform policy and programme design.

The U4’s thematic work on evaluation and measurement addresses the lack of credible, unbiased evidence on outcomes and impact of anti-corruption interventions, which means that policy and programme designs are not optimally informed. Understand how evaluations of anti-corruption projects, programmes and strategies can be improved and how to use measurement tools correctly.  

Use this U4 theme page to, among other things:

CroppedImage304230 Evaluation Measurement

Contact

Jesper Stenberg Johnsøn

Senior Advisor

jesper.johnson@cmi.no

+47 47 93 80 09

Governance and Anticorruption: From Risks to Results

A video from the Independent Evaluation Group of the World Bank on the recently released evaluation of World Bank’s work in Governance and Anticorruption in country-level operations
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Author: Benjamin Olken
Release date: December 2007

Monitoring Corruption: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia

This paper presents a randomized field experiment on reducing corruption
in over 600 Indonesian village road projects. I find that increasing
government audits from 4 percent of projects to 100 percent
reduced missing expenditures, as measured by discrepancies between
official project costs and an independent engineers’ estimate of costs,
by eight percentage points. By contrast, increasing grassroots participation
in monitoring had little average impact, reducing missing expenditures
only in situations with limited free-rider problems and
limited elite capture. Overall, the results suggest that traditional topdown
monitoring can play an important role in reducing corruption,
even in a highly corrupt environment

This paper presents a randomized field experiment on reducing corruption in over 600 Indonesian village road projects. It finds that increasing government audits from 4 percent of projects to 100 percent reduced missing expenditures, as measured by discrepancies between official project costs and an independent engineers’ estimate of costs, by eight percentage points. By contrast, increasing grassroots participation in monitoring had little average impact, reducing missing expenditures only in situations with limited free-rider problems and limited elite capture. Overall, the results suggest that traditional topdown monitoring can play an important role in reducing corruption, even in a highly corrupt environment

9780754624059
Author: Charles Sampford, Arthur Shacklock, Carmel Connors, and Fredrik Galtung
Release date: December 2006

Measuring Corruption

In this book, Transparency International's (TI) world-renowned 'Corruption Perception Index' (CPI) and 'Bribery Perception Index' (BPI) are explained and examined by a group of experts. They set out to establish to what extent they are reliable measures of corruption and whether a series of surveys can measure changes in corruption and the effectiveness of anti-corruption strategies. The book contains a variety of expert contributions which deal with the complexity, difficulty and potential for measuring corruption as the key to developing effective strategies for combating it.

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