Anti-Corruption Agencies

Anti-corruption agencies are important, and contested, players in the fight against corruption. Find the latest evidence on their value and performance on this theme page

The number of Anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) around the world has increased dramatically over the past decades. Nevertheless, the value of ACAs is increasingly being questioned by international donors and national governments. Frequently, ACAs are not considered to deliver on the high expectations bestowed upon then. The question is by which measure - and how - we assess the performance of these institutions, and how we can best improve their performance. On this page you can:

Author: European Partners Against Corruption
Release date: June 2012

Anti-Corruption Authority Standards and Police Oversight Principles

This handbook is a compilation of the Anti-Corruption Authority Standards
and Police Oversight Principles, documents of a recommendatory nature
unanimously adopted by the EPAC/EACN General Assembly in November
2011. They contain sets of guidelines for rendering police oversight and
anti-corruption work more effective in order to better address common
challenges. Being in line with major international conventions and
jurisprudence, they are to be seen in accordance with the fundamental
principles of a country’s legal system.
The Anti-Corruption Authority Standards, and their annex, the Ten Guiding Principles on the Notion
of Independence, are designed to promote transparent, independent anti-corruption bodies, as
called for by Articles 6 and 36 of the UNCAC for example. Similarly, the Police Oversight Principles
purport to promote a model of effective independent police oversight which organizations and
governments can aspire to

This handbook is a compilation of the Anti-Corruption Authority Standards and Police Oversight Principles, documents of a recommendatory nature unanimously adopted by the EPAC/EACN General Assembly in 2011. They contain sets of guidelines for rendering police oversight and anti-corruption work more effective in order to better address common challenges. These standards are aspirational rather than mandatory, and would be hard to meet in most of the developing world.

handbook
Author: Francesca Recanatini
Release date: December 2011

Anti-corruption authorities: an effective tool to curb corruption?

The study addresses the question of what makes ACAs an effective policy tool to combat corruption, or, conversely, what the factors are that may help to reinforce the ability of ACAs to resist efforts to undercut effectiveness. The data is based on a short survey of 50 ACAs as well as seven case studies. It challenges the negative view of ACAs common amongst many practitioners, whilst underscoring that success factors, such as political will and commitment, clear mandates, and performance indicators, are often necessary for success

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