Anti-Corruption Agencies

Anti-corruption agencies are important, and contested, players in the fight against corruption. Find the latest evidence on their value and performance on this theme page

The number of Anti-corruption agencies (ACAs) around the world has increased dramatically over the past decades. Nevertheless, the value of ACAs is increasingly being questioned by international donors and national governments. Frequently, ACAs are not considered to deliver on the high expectations bestowed upon then. The question is by which measure - and how - we assess the performance of these institutions, and how we can best improve their performance. On this page you can:

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Author: Samuel de Jaegere
Release date: July 2012

South-South Exchange on Effective Anti-Corruption Agencies: Bhutan, Maldives and Timor-Leste

This report documents the proceedings, good practices and lessons learned from an exchange which took place in 2011 between the Anti-Corruption Commissions of Bhutan, Maldives and Timor-Leste. The exchange was hosted by ACC Bhutan with support from UNDP Asia-Pacific Regional Centre in Bangkok and UNDP Country Offices in the three countries. It provides insights into the experiences of these three young agencies, and more particularly, into the strategies that they have adopted to combat corruption.

insights into the experiences
of these three young agencies, and more particularly, into the strategies that they have adopted to
combat corruption
Author: European Partners Against Corruption
Release date: June 2012

Anti-Corruption Authority Standards and Police Oversight Principles

This handbook is a compilation of the Anti-Corruption Authority Standards
and Police Oversight Principles, documents of a recommendatory nature
unanimously adopted by the EPAC/EACN General Assembly in November
2011. They contain sets of guidelines for rendering police oversight and
anti-corruption work more effective in order to better address common
challenges. Being in line with major international conventions and
jurisprudence, they are to be seen in accordance with the fundamental
principles of a country’s legal system.
The Anti-Corruption Authority Standards, and their annex, the Ten Guiding Principles on the Notion
of Independence, are designed to promote transparent, independent anti-corruption bodies, as
called for by Articles 6 and 36 of the UNCAC for example. Similarly, the Police Oversight Principles
purport to promote a model of effective independent police oversight which organizations and
governments can aspire to

This handbook is a compilation of the Anti-Corruption Authority Standards and Police Oversight Principles, documents of a recommendatory nature unanimously adopted by the EPAC/EACN General Assembly in 2011. They contain sets of guidelines for rendering police oversight and anti-corruption work more effective in order to better address common challenges. These standards are aspirational rather than mandatory, and would be hard to meet in most of the developing world.

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