Education Sector

Education is key for development. Learn about strategies to reduce corruption’s negative impact on a sector that receives significant foreign aid.

Teachers withholding curriculum to charge for private tutoring, students paying to access exams before tests, ghost teachers and school buildings, embezzlement of capitation grants and favoring of textbook publishing companies in exchange for campaign donations: corruption can take many forms in the education sector. Learn how to address the problem from the ministry level to the smallest school. 

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Corruption in the education sector

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Author: Poisson, M
Release date: January 2009

Guidelines for the design and effective use of teacher codes of conducts

To increase the professionalization of teacher, several countries have developed codes of conduct in the education sector. But even when such codes exist, their impact is sometimes questionable due to a variety of reasons. UNESCO has developed comprehensive guidelines not only to guide countries willing to design (or review) their code but also to implement and monitor how the code is used at all levels in the sector, including its integration into teachers

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Author: Daniel Suryadarma
Release date: March 2008

Corruption, Public Spending, and Education Outcomes: Evidence from Indonesia

This paper takes advantage of a new corruption measure across regions within a country to measure the influence of corruption on public spending efficacy in the education sector in Indonesia, one of the most corrupt countries in the world. I find that public spending has a negligible effect on education outcomes in highly corrupt regions, while it has a statistically significant, positive, and relatively large effect in less corrupt regions. I do not find any direct effect of corruption on education outcomes, hence implying that one channel through which corruption adversely affects the education system is through reducing the effectiveness of public spending.

This paper takes advantage of a new corruption measure across regions within a country
to measure the influence of corruption on public spending efficacy in the education
sector in Indonesia, one of the most corrupt countries in the world. I find that public
spending has a negligible effect on education outcomes in highly corrupt regions, while
it has a statistically significant, positive, and relatively large effect in less corrupt
regions. I do not find any direct effect of corruption on education outcomes, hence
implying that one channel through which corruption adversely affects the education
system is through reducing the effectiveness of public spendingThis paper takes advantage of a new corruption measure across regions within a country to measure the influence of corruption on public spending efficacy in the education sector in Indonesia, one of the most corrupt countries in the world. It finds that public spending has a negligible effect on education outcomes in highly corrupt regions, while it has a statistically significant, positive, and relatively large effect in less corrupt regions. It does not find any direct effect of corruption on education outcomes, hence implying that one channel through which corruption adversely affects the education system is through reducing the effectiveness of public spending.
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